Monday, August 31, 2015

Now they’re in trouble!

@ Michael Chevy Castranova 2015

In the latest chapter of “Slipped,” Tyler (left) and Mendacity Wilson are at the mercy of the mysterious Cartier Tour (right), who claims to be a chrono bounty hunter — someone who hunts down those who’ve violated history. Which Tyler — aka the Scarlet Sparrow — has done repeatedly.

The notion of “Slipped” is to pick up on the adventure and naive charm of the newspaper comic strips of the 1930s and ’40s, when the heroes saved the day — but not always — and their adventures ran almost forever. Think of “Little Orphan Annie,” possibly the best comic strip of all time, or “Dick Tracy” or even “The Gumps” or “The Bungle Family.”

You never knew what was going to happen next.

The difference is our Scarlet Sparrow is far more reckless and has a lot more enemies. Take a look by starting at this link.

It’s an adventure.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

A New Adventure

Have you ever taken a look at the new Phantom Lady collections, from the mid-1940s and drawn by the excellent Matt Baker? There’s a little of that influence in “Slipped,” my own comic strip that’s been running online since early 2008.
“Slipped” is an adventure strip modeled on those fun 1930s and 1940s adventure newspaper comic strip. Which means I certainly looked to “Terry and the Pirates” — by Milton Caniff — and “Buzz Sawyer” and even a little “Little Orphan Annie.”
In this week’s chapter, Tyler Wilson — aka the Scarlet Sparrow — and her sister, Mendacity — who’s been masquerading as the Scarlet Sparrow — have trapped on a Paris rooftop, where it’s revealed that … well, take a look for yourself.
It’s a new enemy, in the person of Cartier Tour, and a whole new adventure.
Here’s a link — http://slippedcomic.blogspot.com/
And here is some sample art, to tempt you to try “Slipped.” Take a look!

Slipped @ Michael Chevy Castranova, 2015

Thursday, August 13, 2015

A new ally? Or a future foe?

In chapter 345, the Scarlet Sparrow, aka Tyler Wilson, and her sister Mendacity meet up with a stranger on the rooftops of Paris, in 1926. What does she want? Nothing helpful, it seems, as she’s pointing some kind of futuristic weapon at the pair.
But in “Slipped,” you never know.
Please follow along for the thrilling adventures of the Scarlet Sparrow and her pals.
Based on the newspaper adventure comic strips of the 1930s and ’40s, “Slipped” is modeling after “Terry and the Pirates,” “Wash Tubbs and Captain Easy” and so many other strips of that turbulent era — but a 21st century twist.
Take a look — http://slippedcomic.blogspot.com/

Slipped and related images @Michael Chevy Castranova, 2015

Saturday, August 8, 2015

Catch up with Slipped: The adventure comic strip

Take a look at the latest chapter in Slipped, my online-only 1930s-style adventure comic strip, by following the link below.
The comic strip/graphic novel — part Terry and the Pirates, part Corto Maltese and a little bit Star Crash — has been running for more than seven years, and if you’re just tuning in, here’s what’s happening:
After many daring adventures in time and even to the moon, Tyler Wilson, aka the Scarlet Sparrow, has returned to Paris in 1926 to confront her younger sister, Mendacity, who has assumed the Scarlet Sparrow guise as a cat burglar. After a brief rooftop struggle, which Tyler wins, Mendacity says she’s up to something far more complex than simple thefts.
So here is your chance to catch up with their battles with each other, the forces of fascism and even the devil himself …
http://slippedcomic.blogspot.com/

And if you want a recap of all seven-plus years, start here:  http://slippedcomic.blogspot.com/2015/06/chapter-339-recap-intermission.html

From chapter 344 of Slipped. Slipped is @ Michael Chevy Castranova, 2015

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Joe Sacco’s “The Great War” review

Here’s a link to my review of Joe Sacco’s amazing, 24-foot-long book, “The Great War,” about the Battle of the Somme, as it appeared in The Gazette daily newspaper in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. http://thegazette.com/2014/03/26/the-great-war-a-great-graphic-book-for-a-terrible-day/